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Thinking of Buying a property with a suite? Here are some things you should keep in mind:

 

SURREY — The City of Surrey may start fining homeowners who claim they don’t have a secondary suite, but in fact do.

Homeowners doing so will be subject to a $1,000 fine, if a corporate report suggesting the changes is passed at a council meeting Monday night.

In 2010, council approved changes to the city’s zoning bylaw to allow secondary suites. Then in 2011, the city introduced a secondary suite service fee, which is currently $495 per suite per year.

When that fee was introduced, the city’s records show there were 17,300 properties with a suite.

Since then, the city’s inventory of suites has grown to 24,150.

Once a suite fee is attached to a property, the only way to remove it is if the owner arranges for an inspection by a bylaw enforcement officer to confirm the suite no longer exists. The corporate report that was expected to go before council Monday (Sept. 23) says staff have realized some property owners are removing their secondary suites on a temporary basis to satisfy bylaw inspection, then reinstating the suite afterward.

The city is now considering a $1,000 fine that will be levied against owners in the event that a suite is found on a property not registered to have one.

Suites that are removed and inspected by the city would be subject to re-inspection if the bylaw changes are accepted, and homeowners would be fined if the suite were being used illegally.

In 2012, Kim Carron from Cloverdale told the Now she was charged the fee for having a secondary suite because she prepared a room downstairs in her home for her 69-year-old blind father-in-law and the room contained a stove.

She asked what made a suite a suite.

It turned out, the list of cooking appliances that can turn a room into a secondary suite in Surrey includes counter-top, gas or electric ranges or stoves, counter-top cooking units, hot plates, wall ovens, convection ovens, microwaves, toasters, electric frying pans, electric woks, pressure cookers and crock pots.

Check back Tuesday to see what happened during Monday's council meeting.

 

- See more at: http://www.thenownewspaper.com/news/lying-about-secondary-suites-in-surrey-may-cost-you-1k-1.635375#sthash.8xEfBB7C.Jwgv8FRk.dpuf

 

Source- Surrey Now News Paper

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This past weekend i was inducted into the BC Swimming hall of Fame in Whistler, BC!! It was such an honour to be inducted and I thank everyone for their support both in my swimming career, as well as now in my Real Estate career. I would not be where I am without everyone's support!

Here is the article from the event:

 

The best of BC swimming gathered at the Fairmont Whistler resort on Saturday, September 21, as the BCSCAand SwimBC together honored outstanding accomplishments and contributions over the past year, as well as recognizing three new inductees into the BC Swimming Hall of Fame.

 

The first Hall of Fame inductee was Paul Jenkins in the builder category.  A protègé and now colleague of his, Leanne Poulin, gave a heart-felt speech in introducing Jenkins and congratulating him on his induction.

 

The other two members inducted were both in the Athlete category, the first being World Championship medalist (2005) Brittany Reimer, who was introduced by her former coach, Cory Beatt.  He recounted her undying determination, as exemplified by her rather modest initial performances at the Provincial, Western Canadian, and then National level - always culminating in her eventually getting to the top.

 

Finally, Stephanie Dixon, surely one of the most decorated paralympians ever, was introduced by one of her coaches, Ron Jacks.  Coach Jacks recounted, like Reimer, Dixon's relentless determination and never being intimidated in workout or competition.  Jacks pointed out the fact that Dixon won the same event (100 Back) in three successive Paralympic Games (2000, 2004, 2008), each time in World Record time - a feat that has been matched rarely, if ever.

 

The night also provided the setting the annual BCSCA Awards with the following winning the respective categories: 

▪   Development Staff of the Year:  (tie) Vancouver Pacific and Vernon Kokanee

▪   12&U Coach of the Year:  Andrew Lennstrom (HYACK)

▪   14&U Coach of the Year:  Rod Barratt (UVPCS)

▪   15-18yr.old Coach of the Year:  Brad Dingey (PSW)

▪   Youth Coach of the Year:  Janusz Kaczmarek (WVOSC)

▪   Junior Coach of the Year:  Tom Johnson (VNSC)

▪   National Coach of the Year:  Randy Bennett (VAS)

▪   Open Water Coach of the Year:  Randy Bennett (VAS)

▪   International Coach of the Year: Randy Bennett (VAS)

▪   Rubber Boot (Peer recognition) Award:  Ben Keast (WDSC)

The BCSOA recognized Leon Politano as the BC Swim Official of the Year, and Nancy Flood (KCS) was honored for her efforts as the Mies Schootman Volunteer/Administrator of the Year.

Vancouver Pacific Swim Club was honored as SwimBC's Club of the Year for their exceptional work in keeping one additional pool operating in the the city of Vancouver, as well as for hosting BC's first-ever two-pool long course AAA Championships.

 

Eric Hedlin who trains at the Victoria Academy of Swimming won Open Water Swimmer of the Year, while Brianna Nelson (IS) won Female Para-swimmer of the Year (for the second year in a row) for her gold and silver medals at the 2013 IPC World Championships, and Donavan Tildesley (UBCD) won Male Para-swimmer of the Year for his bronze medal at the IPC World Championships.

 

The evening closed with Greg Sanderson of Team Aquatic Supplies presenting Ryan Cochrane (Silver medalist at the 2013 FINA World Championships) as the Male Swimmer of the Year, and Hilary Caldwell (Bronze medalist at World Championships) as the Female Swimmer of the Year

 

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How a Home Inspection Helps You:

 

Whether you're considering buying a particular home, selling your current property – or both – a home inspection can help. A home inspection is an inspection by a qualified professional who takes a close look at every aspect of a home– structure, wiring, plumbing, and more – and identifies issues you may not have noticed yourself. For example, a home inspection can reveal that a furnace will need to be replaced soon, or that there is a water leak into the basement that needs to be fixed. You'll definitely want to get a professional home inspection before you buy a particular property. That's why most offers to purchase a home are conditional upon passing a home inspection. (The last thing you want is to buy your dream home only to discover that the wiring needs to be updated!) You may also want to get a home inspection on your own home before you list it for sale. A certificate from a qualified professional that states that your home passed inspection will make your property more attractive to buyers.

 

Many reputable home inspectors are members of a professional industry association.

In Canada:

• Canada Association of Home & Property Inspectors.

(http://www.cahpi.ca)

• Professional Home and Property Inspectors of Canada.

(http://www.phpic.ca)


Have a great week!

Cheers,

Brittany 

 

 

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